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SteCal software

  • 1.  SteCal software

    Posted 11-03-2021 11:25
    Hello all,

    I appreciate it if you share any experience that you've had with SteCal software. What are the weaknesses and strengths of this software? 

    Thanks,

    ------------------------------
    Neda Mandkarian
    Metallurgist
    McLAren Engineering
    Livonia MI
    (248) 752-2355
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: SteCal software

    Long Island Chptr Admin
    Posted 11-04-2021 10:35
    Neda and co -

    Does anyone know if SteCal software will be upgraded
    for Windows 10 and 11?

    thanks and regards,
    - Jim

    Long Island Chapter

    ***********************************************************************************
    SteCal 3.0 is a program for predicting the properties obtained from
    heat treating low-alloy steels. Available for the first time in user-
    friendly Microsoft Windows format, SteCal calculates the parameters
    and behavioral properties representative of low-alloy steels, and
    predicts the effects of heat treating such steels. It is an excellent
    tool for heat treaters to use in estimating and refining heat treating
    parameters for unfamiliar steels. SteCal is also useful for comparing
    the properties of two steels of different composition, which can help
    to suggest the most appropriate composition for a particular application.

    SteCal is based on the most effective and precise heat treating
    calculation routines available. It can be used to predict heat
    treating data such as lower critical temperature, critical point
    of heating, highest feasible tempering temperature, austenitizing
    temperature, susceptibility to quench cracking, and hardness obtained
    from various treatments. The program can be used to generate CT diagrams,
    IT diagrams, hardness versus tempering curves (with calculated tensile
    strength, yield strength, and elongation values), and Jominy end-quench
    hardenability curves. Data can be viewed as graphs or tables.

    SteCal 3.0 is compatible with Windows XP and Windows 7.

    Publisher: ASM International
    Published: 2004
    ISBN: 978-0-87170-796-3

    ***********************************************************************************






  • 3.  RE: SteCal software

    Staff Liaison
    Posted 11-05-2021 10:09
      |   view attached

    Jim,

    I recently installed SteCal 3.0 on a 64-bit Windows 10 machine, and it seems to work fine. I updated the page in the ASM store to reflect this.

    The SteCal 3.0 manual is attached for those who may be interested in learning more about software. SteCal was created by Professor Pascual Tarin possibly in the 1980s) and he published three versions over time with ASM.

    The user interface is showing its age, but is still functional. ASM has had some discussions about creating an online version of the software. We are interested in feedback about the general capabilities of the software and potential enhancements.



    ------------------------------
    Scott Henry
    Senior Content Engineer
    ASM International
    Materials Park OH
    ------------------------------

    Attachment(s)

    pdf
    SteCal 3.0 manual v2.pdf   1.14 MB 1 version


  • 4.  RE: SteCal software

    Posted 11-06-2021 21:58

    For undergraduate teaching purposes, I've been looking at Ovako's Steel Calculator – it is free, but I would not endeavor to use it for commercial purposes since I have no information about how well vetted it is:

     

    Ovako's Heat Treatment Guide for Steels

     

    Peg Jones, Ph.D., FASM, FASMu

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    Saginaw Valley State University

     

     

    Sent from Mail for Windows

     






  • 5.  RE: SteCal software

    Posted 30 days ago
    It is inevitable that students and other users want to punch in a chemistry and magically everything you might want to know magically appears - like hardness, tensile properties, etc. However the output is only as good as the source data and the algorithms that are used to do the calculations. It would appear that the Ovako system may be based on ASTM A255 which was created by using a very large regression analysis (originally by Caterpillar). It would help if the source data was clearly identified for whichever system is used.
    I would hope that these calculators were only introduced to students after suitable explanations of hardenability and what it means - ie the classic definitions as well as the individual effects of elemental additions on the phase diagram and contributions to hardenability.

    Bob Cryderman

    ------------------------------
    Robert Cryderman FASM
    Research Associate Professor
    Colorado School Of Mines
    [Golden] [Colorado]
    (734) 735-3093
    ErieErie
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: SteCal software

    Posted 27 days ago
    Hi Bob,

    You are right about the plug-and-chug mindset -- the bane of learning anything! My class includes a thorough introduction to the science of the Fe-C system and the effects of different elements on hardenability, strength and toughness. Once they get that, I would like some means of showing them general trends that they can play with, rather than only look at the hardenability curves in handbooks, or the plots of strength vs C wt% for different tempering temperatures. I teach out of the handbooks anyway so they learn to use them, but a little variety helps.

    Thanks everyone!
    Harold

    ------------------------------
    Harold Ackler
    Clinical Assistant Professor
    Micron School or Materials Science and Engineering
    Boise State University
    Boise ID
    408-230-7277 cell
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: SteCal software

    Posted 29 days ago
    Is the software only available on CD-ROM?


    ------------------------------
    Ken Kirby
    Snap-on, Inc.
    Kenosha WI
    (262) 748-3836
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: SteCal software

    Staff Liaison
    Posted 29 days ago
    Ken,

    That is how the software is delivered to the user. The software is then installed on a local machine.

    Scott

    ------------------------------
    Scott Henry
    Senior Content Engineer
    ASM International
    Materials Park OH
    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: SteCal software

    Posted 28 days ago
    Many of our PCs don't have CD-ROM drives anymore. Is it possible to use a PC with CD-ROM to copy the files to a flash drive so that they can be installed on a PC that doesn't have a CD-ROM?

    ------------------------------
    Ken Kirby
    Snap-on, Inc.
    Kenosha WI
    (262) 748-3836
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: SteCal software

    Staff Liaison
    Posted 28 days ago
    Ken,
    I will investigate this.
    Scott

    ------------------------------
    Scott Henry
    Senior Content Engineer
    ASM International
    Materials Park OH
    ------------------------------



  • 11.  RE: SteCal software

    Posted 27 days ago

    Ken,

     

    It's possible to copy a .ISO "image" of the CD to your computer and access it with a virtual CD drive. This appears to still be possible with Windows 10: https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/add-permanent-a-virtual-cddvd-drive-in-windows-10/b20d1126-6f0e-45d6-8384-5ec30105d844

     

    So someone with the disc would just need to rip the .ISO file and attempt installation. In my limited experience it doesn't work 100% of the time, but it would be quick to test and require no modification of the software if it worked.

     

    Best Regards,

    GIW Industries, Inc. (A KSB Company)
    Advanced Manufacturing Engineer – Metallurgy & Foundry Systems


    Paul Taylor

    5000 Wrightsboro Road
    Grovetown, Ga 30813
    Tel.: +1 706-863-1011 ext 2559
    Fax: +1 706-868-8025
    Email: paul.taylor@ksb.com

    http://www.giwindustries.com

     






  • 12.  RE: SteCal software

    Posted 27 days ago
    Wow, that brings me down memory lane. I've worked with all of those concepts, but it has been a decade or two. Good suggestion, thanks.

    ------------------------------
    Ken Kirby
    Snap-on, Inc.
    Kenosha WI
    (262) 748-3836
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: SteCal software

    Posted 11-05-2021 12:02
    Hi Neda

    Thank you for posting this. I was not aware of this software and am now thinking it could be useful.

    All -
    Has anyone ever used this to teach about steel and its heat treating? I run a 2-3 week steel heat treating module in my junior-level materials properties lab* courses with four alloys (1018, 1045, 4140, and 4340) to investigate the effects of carbon and other alloying elements on steel properties (HR, tension test) in the cold worked, quenched and tempered materials. This tool looks like it could be quite helpful for helping students learn these things in greater depth. It sounds like they could change composition and see what would happen.

    Any thoughts?

    Thank you.
    Harold Ackler

    ------------------------------
    Harold Ackler
    Clinical Assistant Professor
    Micron School or Materials Science and Engineering
    Boise State University
    Boise ID
    408-230-7277 cell
    ------------------------------