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Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

  • 1.  Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Staff Liaison
    Posted 03-10-2020 15:17
    The ongoing news regarding transmission of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, has me wondering about the longer-term implications for design, materials selection, and processing. Are the use of certain materials or treatments (e.g., for high-contact surfaces such as door handles, railings, plumbing fixtures) helpful in reducing the spread of viruses?

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    Scott Henry
    Senior Content Engineer
    ASM International
    Materials Park OH
    (440) 338-5401
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  • 2.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 03-11-2020 07:03
    Scott,
    Yes, various metals have been found to have anti-viral and anti-bacterial properties.  Here is a link to an article with a quick summary, though it doesn't list any references.  Basically, copper is great, silver can be good but it depends.
    http://theconversation.com/copper-is-great-at-killing-superbugs-so-why-dont-hospitals-use-it-73103

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    Paul Tibbals, P.E.
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  • 3.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 03-11-2020 22:35
    Traditionally in Bengal (India) we used to use copper and brass glasses, plates, jugs and  and other vessels in  till fifties.Also all Hindu puja utensils ,lamps etc are made from copper or brass.In India copper or copper plated utensils for regular use are coming back again  
    Biomedical material research is mostly confined in developing different in -plants.It may be worthwhile to research the reactions of materials to  virus.      


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    Ram Chattopadhyay
    Mumbai
    91226324762
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  • 4.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 03-11-2020 07:03
    Two words, Mr. Henry:

    Antimicrobial copper.

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    Ted Reinhart
    Materials & Processes Engineer
    Boeing
    Kent WA
    206-225-4170
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  • 5.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 03-11-2020 15:42
    Scott

    Copper Development Association had done excellent research starting 2000 and published many research papers on the anti-microbial benefits of the metal. You could access them in Copper.Org website. The research efforts were focused on testing copper's efficacy on many bacterial infections including E-coli and MRSA.  

    https://www.copper.org/applications/antimicrobial/

    I am not sure whether they tested any of the Corona virus such as SARS or MERS.​

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    Muthukumarasamy Sadayappan FASM
    Research Scientist
    Canmet MATERIALS, Natural Resources Canada
    Hamilton ON
    (905) 645-0782
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  • 6.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 03-13-2020 10:40
    The following publication indicated that copper can effective in against coronavirus:

    Human Coronavirus 229E Remains Infectious on Common Touch Surface Materials , Sarah L. Warnes, Zoë R. Little, C. William Keevil mbio.asm.org
    This research was conducted in the laboratory of Professor Bill Keevil at the University of Southampton in the UK. This paper is on Coronavirus 229E, and not the newly emerged coronavirus strain, COVID-19. However since these two stains are similar in structure, copper is also likely to be effective against COVID-19. It should be noted that Keevil's lab also has published papers showing that copper alloys are effective against other viruses, whose structures are not similar coronavirus, including Influenza A and Norovirus. As you know, the latter commonly infects cruise ship passengers.

    Harold T. Michels, PhD
    Retired from Inco Ltd & Copper Development Association
    email: cu.microbes.co,
    website: www.amcopper.com

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    Harold Michels
    Consultant, Formerly Senior Vice President, Copper Development Association
    Retires from Copper Dev Assoc. & Inco Ltd.
    Manhasset NY
    (516) 627-5335
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  • 7.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Staff Liaison
    Posted 03-13-2020 16:33
    Thanks, all, for the responses. I work at the ASM Headquarters building (under the dome). The building design includes many interesting uses of different metals, including brass handrails on the "floating staircase" in the center of the building. I always thought the choice of brass was made for aesthetic reasons, but perhaps the antimicrobial properties were also a consideration. 



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    Scott Henry
    Senior Content Engineer
    ASM International
    Materials Park OH
    (440) 338-5401
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  • 8.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 03-15-2020 14:43
    A new study shows that copper is effective against the newly emerged strain of Coronavirus.

    It reports that Coronavirus COVID-19 survives on copper for up to 4 hours, compared to for up to 48 to 72 hours on stainless steel and plastic. After up to 4hours, which seems long time but the virus will be gone without any human intervention.

    The study, publish as a preprint (March 9th, 2020), was conducted by U.S. government and university scientists and can be found at:
    https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.03.09.20033217v1.full.pdf

    Thanks, Harold Michels


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    Harold Michels
    Consultant, Formerly Senior Vice President, Copper Development Association
    Retires from Copper Dev Assoc. & Inco Ltd.
    Manhasset NY
    (516) 627-5335
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  • 9.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 04-18-2020 08:57
    Just saw this collaboration with University Hospital here in Cleveland - copper infused masks.  Thought it might be of interest. A number of companies are making these masks.

    https://www.newswise.com/coronavirus/uh-and-cupron-collaborate-to-provide-reusable-copper-infused-masks-to-caregivers/?article_id=730136



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    Carrie Hawk
    ASM International
    Community Engagement Specialist

    440-338-5497
    carrieh@asminternational.org
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  • 10.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 04-25-2020 22:18
    Dear everyone, I do not know if my comment will add much or not, it is a simple comment, from the little that I know in this line, but I understand that Copper has served as anti-fungus and anti-humidity by adding it in insoles or in parts of footwear. And from what I read from colleagues the beloved noble metal and from the first discovered by humanity, it comes out to meet us in this context of COVID-19!

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    [Silvana] [Carrizo]
    [Ms.]
    [Engineer]
    [UTN FRM]
    [Mendoza] [Argentina]
    [+542615577229]
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  • 11.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 04-26-2020 15:54
    Our team has recently filed a provisional patent describing the use of copper-precipitation-strengthened steels for applications as antimicrobial touch surfaces.  These steels were originally developed for bridges because of their excellent strength-toughness-weathering resistance combination.  It dawned on us that the nanometer-sized copper precipitates can exhibit similar antimicrobial properties as copper or copper-rich alloys.  Even at a few wt.% copper concentration, the steels deactivate E. coli in less than 30 minutes just like pure copper.  The surface chemistry literature indicates that chemical reactivity can be size-dependent.  We suspect that on a per atom basis, nanometer-sized copper may have enhanced antimicrobial potency than pure copper.  Perhaps materials scientists and engineers can do something about these nasty coronaviruses!

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    Yip-wah Chung FASM
    Northwestern University
    Evanston IL
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  • 12.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 04-27-2020 07:43
    https://patents.google.com/patent/US5861068A/en?oq=5861068

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    Robert Foley
    Modine Manufacturing Company
    Naperville IL
    (630) 730-1743
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  • 13.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 04-27-2020 11:03
    Dear Bob,

    Thank you very much for the heads up about the Japanese patent, which expired several years ago. There have been quite a few similar publications describing the addition of copper to stainless steels to obtain antimicrobial properties. The common denominator is a rather brute-force method of high-temperature treatment (500-900oC) to cause copper to segregate to the surface. One concern is sensitization. Further, once the segregating copper precipitates/layers are removed due to use, they cannot be replenished without going through another high-temperature treatment. It is challenging to make copper migrate through the chromium oxide passivation layer at ambient temperatures.

    Cheers,
    Yip-Wah

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    Yip-wah Chung FASM
    Northwestern University
    Evanston IL
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  • 14.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Long Island Admin
    Posted 04-27-2020 11:03
    Yip-Wah  and co -

    I strongly suggest you get in contact with Harold Michels.
    He is also an ASM  Fellow, and has worked extensively
    on this subject.


    regards, 

    Jim

    Long Island Chapter

     





  • 15.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 04-27-2020 20:32
    Dear Jim,
    Thank you so much for the lead.  I noted that Michels used to work for the Copper Development Association and that he is listed on LInkedIn.  Let me look him up, send him of a copy of our provisional patent, and hope he can give us his advice.
    Cheers,
    Yip-Wah

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    Yip-wah Chung FASM
    Northwestern University
    Evanston IL
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  • 16.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 04-27-2020 08:19
    Hi Scott,
    I remember a few years ago a set of very interesting research using texturing to prevent bacterial adhesion to surfaces.  It was pretty much insensitive to what the  surface ​was made from (Many chose stainless steel for cleaning purposes).   It worked by using unfavorable topography to prevent the bacterial from adhering, and thus surviving.  I like to think it annoyed the bacteria to death.  I have not heard if such a surface profile control approach could be used for COVID-19 virus, does anyone know if it would be possible?  E-coli is 25 um diameter, and COVID-19 is only 0.12 um diameter, but if the texturing works by creating super-hydrophobicity, then perhaps it could still work for a virus?

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    Bradley Crannell
    Material Innovation Scientist
    Turbocam Energy Solutions
    bradley.crannell@turbocam.com
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  • 17.  RE: Materials considerations in reducing virus transmissions

    Posted 19 days ago
    Here's a recently published article from Advanced Materials & Processes, ASM about a team from America Makes, Youngstown, Ohio.  They share how they have mobilized the additive manufacturing community to work together to address the nation's medical equipment shortages during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    READ IT HERE

    About the Authors

    • John Wilcynski, executive director, America Makes
    • Alexander Steeb, director of operations, America Makes (alexander.steeb@ncdmm.org)
    • Brandon Ribic, director of technology, America Makes @Brandon Ribic
    • Andrew Resnick, director of communications and public affairs, America Makes
    • Marck Cotteleer, managing director, Deloitte Consulting
    • Corinne Charlton, managing director, Deloitte Consulting @Corinne Charlton
    ​​​​​​​​​

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    Carrie Hawk
    ASM International
    Community Engagement Specialist

    440-338-5497
    carrieh@asminternational.org
    ------------------------------