ASM Online Member Community

  • 1.  Regarding Erosive Particles

    Posted 20 days ago
    Hello Everyone,

    Can you please guide me on what type of erosive particles are found in the gas turbine engine? I guess it might be the silica particles (Please correct me if I am wrong). Also, I am wondering what would be the range of particle sizes of the erodent. I would appreciate your help. 


    Regards
    RB Nair




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    Rakesh Bhaskaran Nair
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Concordia University
    (780) 604-4431
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  • 2.  RE: Regarding Erosive Particles

    Posted 19 days ago
    RB Nair -

    Search for "cmas turbine".

    - Jim





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  • 3.  RE: Regarding Erosive Particles

    Posted 18 days ago
    Hi Rakesh,

    As Jim as stated in his reply... you need to search for "CMAS turbine". It is a good start.

    Commercial and military turbine engines are typically exposed to foreign objects, such as dust, volcanic ash, sand storms, hail stones, sleet pellets, runway sand/gravel/debris and even birds.

    More specifically, the airborne particles that cause erosion in gas turbines are highly based on a calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicates (CMAS) mineral compositions; which basically constitute over 90% of the Earth's crust. These airborne particles are created by dust storms, volcanoes and fly ash.

    Regarding the particle sizes, as an example, the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) 03 Test Dust exhibits an overall particle size range from ~1 micron up to ~100 microns. The AFRL 03 Test Dust (blend of different minerals) was designed to generate erosion and form CMAS-like deposits in hot sections during full-scale rotating engine tests, i.e., real engine test. I would hypothesize these micron-sized ones represent the airborne dust (CMAS-precursor-based) particles.

    On the other hand, runway sand/gravel particles, hail stones, sleet pellets and runway debris (and of course birds) can be larger than that, even reaching diameters of few millimeters or more.

    I hope it helps!

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    Rogerio Lima, PhD
    Senior Research Officer
    National Research Council of Canada
    President of Thermal Spray Society (TSS)

    e-mail: rogerio.lima@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca
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  • 4.  RE: Regarding Erosive Particles

    Posted 14 days ago
    Hi Rogerio,

    Thank you for the suggestion. I will look into the CMAS exposure.

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    Rakesh Bhaskaran Nair
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Concordia University
    (780) 604-4431
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